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Boulder Peak Triathlon Race Report

About 12 days ago my body said enough and I hit a wall training-wise.  Fatigue, lack of power, and general disinterest took its toll and without taking too drastic measures my coach scaled back my training and by the end of last week I was tired, …

Boulder Peak Triathlon Race Report

About 12 days ago my body said enough and I hit a wall training-wise.  Fatigue, lack of power, and general disinterest took its toll and without taking too drastic measures my coach scaled back my training and by the end of last week I was tired, …

Abemama vs. OWC Lifestyle Threads

11 July, 2014. “We’re a deep, collective determination of forward-thinking and creative minds, to exploit one’s passion to live and dream.” The moon holds great significance for the OWC… Years ago at the beginning of a concept, which combined our … Continued

Everything you need to know about the teams and contenders in this year’s Tour de France | News.com.au

Vincenzo Nibali will lead Astana’s general classification hopes. Source: Getty Images EVERYTHING you need to know about the teams and the contenders to look out for in this year’s Tour de France. AG2R LA MONDIALE From: France Sponsor: Joint title sponsors are both French companies — Ag2R is an insurance and retirement fund group while La Mondiale specialises in

Medal events for 2016 Paralympics announced

ITU, in conjunction with the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), today announced three of the six medal events that will be contested in paratriathlon’s debut at the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Paralympic Games.

The men’s PT1 and PT4 sport classes have now been confirmed as two of the men’s three medal events, while the women’s PT4 has gained a berth in Rio.

“Paratriathlon’s addition to the Paralympic programme is going to be a monumental moment for our sport,” said ITU President and IOC Member Marisol Casado. “As paratriathlon continues to expand drastically each year, we remain committed to evolving with its growing demands and competitiveness. We are hopeful and dedicated to seeing even more medal events contested in Tokyo.”

To allow for further analysis of the remaining sport classes, the IPC and ITU will continue working closely together during the summer to identify the remaining medal events.

With the six medal events to be evenly split amongst genders, one additional medal event will be assigned for the men, while two medal events will be announced for the women.

The IPC will make its final decision on these medal events following its board meeting in October.

Boulder Peak Triathlon Race Report

About 12 days ago my body said enough and I hit a wall training-wise.  Fatigue, lack of power, and general disinterest took its toll and without taking too drastic measures my coach scaled back my training and by the end of last week I was tired, but felt recovered to have a good race.  I wasn't.

I was chatting with a pro triathlete at Master's swimming last Wednesday and he remarked that he didn't know how we age groupers did it.  Working full-time with kids and training 10 hours a week.  That was good to hear.

My pre-race went by-the-book and my swim warmup was good and I felt good.  I realized that I'd forgotten to take my GU chomps but got them in first thing on the bike.  I lined up at the front of the swim next to Steve Johnson and Eric Kenney, two VERY fast guys.  Eric asked me if I was going out hard.  I said yes.  He asked "20 minutes?"  "Probably 23," I said, "I'm finding Steve's feet and hanging on."  Eric followed with he needed 10 minutes to stay with Steve.  I said I needed 20.  Eric beat me out of the water by a little over a minute and I over Steve by around the same amount.  Of course, both then proceeded to crush me on the bike and run.

T1 was fast.  This was the first race where I left my bike shoes clipped in and while it was weird getting my feet in my shoes and closing the velcro, everything was fine.  Even with the shoes being a little lose and my feet having sand still on them, after a few minutes I didn't even notice.  Climbing out of the res on 51st and then on Jay was fine, but I should have realized something was up during the long, false flat up to the 36/Broadway merge.  My power was only slightly low, but I couldn't generate it in my aero bars - which was not normal.  By the time I hit the flats on 36 before and after Neva I was riding in my aero bars, but my power was off.  By the end of the bike, my average power was in the low 190s and it should have been between 210 and 220.  As a result, my projected bike time was way off.  I easily lost 5 minutes.

T2 was fast.  I remembered to roll my socks beforehand so I could just unroll them onto my feet (next season, I'm going to start training again without socks.  It's free speed and they're completely unnecessary).  Heading out onto the run, I realized I forgot my Garmin on my bike and had to race by feel.  I held back going out and felt ok until around mile 1 when I noticed the fatigue started setting in.  I didn't have to gut through anything just yet, I just kept running.  No stopping at the aid stations, but grabbing water to hydrate and douse to cool off.  By the time I hit mile 4, I was wiped and was struggling to just stay running.  At one point I had to stop and walk for a minute but forced myself to start jogging again.  At some point past mile 3 after the turnaround, my teammate Jeremy passed me still on his way out.  My first thought was that he was going to catch me and my second was that I really didn't care.  He caught me between miles 5 and 6 and later said that I wasn't looking great by then.  I'm sure.  I was able to pick it up a little the last half to 3/4 of a mile, but it was all I could do to get to the finish.  One positive was that while the run was hot, it didn't really bother me much.  I need to be better about dumping water on my front and and not just the top of my head and down my back.

Thanks to my coach Billy Edwards, my team Foxtrot Wheel & Edgemy teammates, my sponsor GU EnergyColorado Multisport, and my wife for the support.

Race Results:

165th overall (149th out of 557 men, 948 total athletes, including relays)
32nd out of 98 in age groupSwim (1500m):  21:59 (3rd fastest in AG, and 21st fastest overall)T1: 1:37Bike (26 mi): 1:13:23 (37th in AG)T2: 1:09Run (10km):  53:16

Total:  2:31:25

Boulder Peak Triathlon Race Report

About 12 days ago my body said enough and I hit a wall training-wise.  Fatigue, lack of power, and general disinterest took its toll and without taking too drastic measures my coach scaled back my training and by the end of last week I was tired, but felt recovered to have a good race.  I wasn't.

My pre-race went by-the-book and my swim warmup was good and I felt good.  I realized that I'd forgotten to take my GU chomps but got them in first thing on the bike.  I lined up at the front of the swim next to Steve Johnson and Eric Kenney, two VERY fast guys.  Eric asked me if I was going out hard.  I said yes.  He asked "20 minutes?"  "Probably 23," I said, "I'm finding Steve's feet and hanging on."  Eric followed with he needed 10 minutes to stay with Steve.  I said I needed 20.  Eric beat me out of the water by a little over a minute and I over Steve by around the same amount.  Of course, both then proceeded to crush me on the bike and run.

T1 was fast.  This was the first race where I left my bike shoes clipped in and while it was weird getting my feet in my shoes and closing the velcro, everything was fine.  Even with the shoes being a little lose and my feet having sand still on them, after a few minutes I didn't even notice.  Climbing out of the res on 51st and then on Jay was fine, but I should have realized something was up during the long, false flat up to the 36/Broadway merge.  My power was only slightly low, but I couldn't generate it in my aero bars - which was not normal.  By the time I hit the flats on 36 before and after Neva I was riding in my aero bars, but my power was off.  By the end of the bike, my average power was in the low 190s and it should have been between 210 and 220.  As a result, my projected bike time was way off.  I easily lost 5 minutes.

T2 was fast.  I remembered to roll my socks beforehand so I could just unroll them onto my feet (next season, I'm going to start training again without socks.  It's free speed and they're completely unnecessary).  Heading out onto the run, I realized I forgot my Garmin on my bike and had to race by feel.  I held back going out and felt ok until around mile 1 when I noticed the fatigue started setting in.  I didn't have to gut through anything just yet, I just kept running.  No stopping at the aid stations, but grabbing water to hydrate and douse to cool off.  By the time I hit mile 4, I was wiped and was struggling to just stay running.  At one point I had to stop and walk for a minute but forced myself to start jogging again.  At some point past mile 3 after the turnaround, my teammate Jeremy passed me still on his way out.  My first thought was that he was going to catch me and my second was that I really didn't care.  He caught me between miles 5 and 6 and later said that I wasn't looking great by then.  I'm sure.  I was able to pick it up a little the last half to 3/4 of a mile, but it was all I could do to get to the finish.  One positive was that while the run was hot, it didn't really bother me much.  I need to be better about dumping water on my front and and not just the top of my head and down my back.

Thanks to my coach Billy Edwards, my team Foxtrot Wheel & Edgemy teammates, my sponsor GU EnergyColorado Multisport, and my wife for the support.

Race Results:

165th overall (149th out of 557 men, 948 total athletes, including relays)
32nd out of 98 in age groupSwim (1500m):  21:59 (3rd fastest in AG, and 21st fastest overall)T1: 1:37Bike (26 mi): 1:13:23 (37th in AG)T2: 1:09Run (10km):  53:16

Total:  2:31:25

Abemama vs. OWC Lifestyle Threads

11 July, 2014.

“We’re a deep, collective determination of forward-thinking and creative minds, to exploit one’s passion to live and dream.”

The moon holds great significance for the OWC… Years ago at the beginning of a concept, which combined our passion for sport, fashion, design, music, life, and to share it amongst the lives of the like minded, the full moon was one of the first design concepts we had whilst searching for inspiration. One reason was simply because of our love for the moon, but it then came to symbolise what we stand for – following your dreams. Since that day it’s always been there to help inspire us, and now it’s time for it to inspire you.

Recently, the OWC launched it’s first of many collections of sports inspired lifestyle threads, and this original moon design was used on a winter cotton crewneck sweat. Not only is it a highly detailed digital print on a highly evolved example of the classic crew sweat, but it also carries with it the deeper meaning of the OWC, including its heritage on Lord Howe Island. This tiny little prehistoric isle in the south pacific, described by Sir David Attenborough as being “so extraordinary it’s almost unbelievable”, is indeed our birthing ground.

Ollie Whistler, the founder of the Collaboration, is amongst one of the few families privileged enough to settle on the island as descendants of Nathan Thompson, an American whaler whom made the first significant house on Lord Howe in the 1860’s. His great grandfather a tailor and his grandmother known on the Island for her immaculate sense of style and fashion, along with a first cousin who owns a fashion boutique in Sydney’s CBD, it comes as no surprise that Ollie is pursuing his passion in clothing. Like all Islanders, he share’s a strong inherent love of Lord Howe and believes the OWC can help educate and inspire the younger generation through it’s involvement within the tight knit community and sharing it’s meaning.

It therefore comes with much anticipation that we reveal our new lifestyle range, including the moon inspired crew neck sweat, is now available in Lord Howe’s local clothing boutique, Abemama. Grown from a passion for the ocean, island life, history and the importance of family and community, it shares many of the same qualities as the OWC. Given our heritage on the Island, it’s all too appropriate that it be the first retail stockist of our lifestyle threads!

If you’re fortunate enough to visit Lord Howe Island in your travels or if you’ve already had the privilege, then you’ll understand the true significance of this rare opportunity. When you find yourself standing upon this unspoiled volcanic wonderland, then please support our local community and businesses to help preserve one of Australia’s most unique natural ecosystems. Drop in and visit the newly renovated and restocked Abemama, and maybe the OWC will find you living “a life for the like mind” on it’s homeland…

 

Alternatively, if you’re not as fortunate to get to Lord Howe Island and shop at Abemama, you can purchase our sport inspired lifestyle range here at our online store > SHOP OWC!

Use the FREE SHIPPING coupon: LORDHOWEISLAND for a limited time only*

 

abemama_open abemama_2 abemama_1 US IMG_9372 IMG_9339 IMG_9229 ladies4 ladies3 lifestyle3

Everything you need to know about the teams and contenders in this year’s Tour de France | News.com.au

Vincenzo Nibali will lead Astana’s general classification hopes.

Vincenzo Nibali will lead Astana’s general classification hopes. Source: Getty Images

EVERYTHING you need to know about the teams and the contenders to look out for in this year’s Tour de France.

AG2R LA MONDIALE

From: France

Sponsor: Joint title sponsors are both French companies — Ag2R is an insurance and retirement fund group while La Mondiale specialises in pension and estate planning insurance.

One to watch: Christophe Riblon (FRA). Was the only French stage winner of last year’s race when he caught Tejay van Garderen on the descent of Alpe d’Huez to take out Stage 18. Or Romain Bardet, who was the best-placed French rider last year and is a contender for the white jersey.

Did you know: The iconic French team is the only team to have ridden every edition of Australia’s Tour Down Under since it started in 1999 and is the only team on the WorldTour to ride Focus bikes.

ASTANA

From: Kazakhstan

Sponsor: A group of state-owned companies from Kazakhstan, also known as the national welfare fund, which have named the team after the country’s capital city.

One to watch: Vincenzo Nibali (ITA, above). Two-time Grand Tour winner at the Vuelta a Espana in 2010 and Giro d’Italia in 2013. Skipped this year’s Giro to focus on the Tour and showed good lead-up form with top 10s at Romandie and the Dauphine. Next option would be Jakob Fuglsang, who was seventh last year and super strong.

Did you know: Astana won the Tour de France with Alberto Contador in 2009 and now has former rider and London Olympic gold medallist Alexander Vinokourov as its general manager.

Bauke Mollema has emerged as a genuine Tour threat.

Bauke Mollema has emerged as a genuine Tour threat. Source: Getty Images

BELKIN

From: The Netherlands

Sponsor: International consumer electronics company Belkin took over as title sponsor in 2013 of the team formerly known as Blanco and before that, Rabobank.

One to watch: Bauke Mollema (NED). Was extremely solid in last year’s Tour de France in which he finished sixth overall and his recent third place at the Tour of Switzerland shows he’s ready to have a crack at top five this year. Sep Vanmarcke would be motivated for Stage 5, which includes cobbled sectors from Paris-Roubaix.

Did you know: The Dutch team is on the hunt for a new sponsor next year after Belkin recently announced it would finish its support at season’s end.

Tejay van Garderen will pick up where Cadel Evans left off for BMC.

Tejay van Garderen will pick up where Cadel Evans left off for BMC. Source: Getty Images

BMC RACING

From: Switzerland

Sponsor: BMC’s title sponsor also provides the bikes the riders climb aboard every day — Swiss bicycle frame manufacturer BMC, which is owned by Andy Rihs.

One to watch: Tejay van Garderen (USA) is the chosen one to succeed Cadel Evans as BMC’s general classification rider at the Tour. The 25-year-old was fifth overall and won the young rider jersey in 2012 but this might be his big chance to confirm his potential before BMC look elsewhere.

Did you know: Cadel Evans won the Tour de France with BMC in 2011 but you won’t see him on the start line this year after he threw everything at trying to win the Giro d’Italia in May.

Peter Sagan is known for some wacky celebrations.

Peter Sagan is known for some wacky celebrations. Source: News Limited

CANNONDALE

From: Italy

Sponsor: Formerly known as Liquigas, the team is now sponsored by American bicycle manufacturer Cannondale, which explains why the team also rides Cannondale bikes.

One to watch: Peter Sagan (SLK). Looms as a once-in-a-generation sprinter/classics rider who has owned the green jersey at the Tour de France for the past two years, and is a hot favourite to make it three in a row. He can sprint and climb, which is a scary combination and if Sagan isn’t firing there’s always former track star Elia Viviani.

Did you know: Cannondale Pro Cycling Team is home to another superstar Slovakian in the making, Matej Mohoric, who won the junior and under-23 world championships in successive years in 2012 and 2013.

FDJ.FR

From: France

Sponsor: An iconic French team, it is sponsored by the French national lottery system.

One to watch: Arnaud Demare (FRA). Winning three stages and the points jersey in this year’s Giro wasn’t enough to get Nacer Bouhanni on the team. Instead it will back 22-year-old Demare to deliver it sprint stage wins. Overall, Thibaut Pinot is a chance to crack the top 10 on general classification.

Did you know: Australian Bradley McGee won a stage of the Tour de France in 2002 and wore the yellow jersey in 2003 while riding for FDJ.

Andrew Talansky is Garmin-Sharp’s big hope for this year’s race.

Andrew Talansky is Garmin-Sharp’s big hope for this year’s race. Source: AP

GARMIN-SHARP

From: United States

Sponsor: Joint sponsors of the team include Garmin — manufacturer of global positioning devices (GPS), which includes everything from fish finders to running watches and bike computers — and global electronic manufacturing company Sharp.

One to watch: Andrew Talansky (US). The 25-year-old is nicknamed the ‘Pit Bull’ and after winning this year’s Criterium du Dauphine he’s ready to unleash his rage on the Tour de France peloton. The team recruited Tom-Jelte Slagter in the off-season and the Dutchman is capable of stage wins.

Did you know: Garmin-Sharp has partnered with global conservation group WWF and has adopted the panda as its unofficial mascot after Irishman Dan Martin was chased by a person in a panda suit as he rode to victory in the 2013 Liege-Bastogne-Liege.

Joaquim Rodriguez rides for Katusha.

Joaquim Rodriguez rides for Katusha. Source: AFP

KATUSHA

From: Russia

Sponsor: The team is referred to as the Russian global cycling project and is backed by Russian businesses.

One to watch: Joaquim Rodriguez (ESP). Rodriguez was expected to challenge for the pink jersey at the Giro d’Italia in May but crashed out on Stage 6, fracturing his ribs. He won’t have big expectations at the Tour but he’s a class act and can’t be overlooked for a stage win at the very least. Also keep an eye on Simon Spilak, who has proven in recent years that he can climb with the likes of Chris Froome, and Alexander Kristoff, who can sprint. If you’re a domestique at Katusha, don’t expect too many days off during the Tour.

Did you know: Aussie sprinter Robbie McEwen called Team Katusha home between 2009-2010 and saluted on Australian soil in the Tour Down Under.

Keep an eye out for Rui Costa in the rainbow colours of the world champion.

Keep an eye out for Rui Costa in the rainbow colours of the world champion. Source: Getty Images

LAMPRE-MERIDA

From: Italy

Sponsor: Joint sponsors involving Italian sheet metal manufacturer Lampre and Taiwanese bike maker Merida, which also supplies the team with its bikes.

One to watch: Rui Costa (POR). Costa provided two memorable highlights of last year’s Tour de France when he produced gutsy rides to win Stages 16 and 19 before going on to win the world championship later in the year. Costa has won the Tour of Switzerland the last three years running, which is the second most important build-up to the Tour de France, so clearly he is coming good at the right time.

Did you know: The team has operated under various names but has always retained Lampre as a title sponsor since 1991. This year it has thrown a lifeline to 42-year-old Vuelta a Espana champion Chris Horner.

Andre Greipel will be Lotto Belisol’s man for stage wins at the Tour.

Andre Greipel will be Lotto Belisol’s man for stage wins at the Tour. Source: AFP

LOTTO-BELISOL

From: Belgium

Sponsor: Joint title sponsors provide the backing for the team and include the Belgian national lottery system and Belisol, which makes windows.

One to watch: Andre Greipel (GER). One of the fastest and most powerful sprinters in the world, Australians know Greipel well from his success at the Tour Down Under. Has won five stages of the Tour de France and with the best organised and executed lead-out trains in the race, he should add to that this year. Their GC option is Jurgen Van Den Broeck, who showed good form at the Dauphine.

Did you know: Lotto-Belisol’s Aussie hard-man Adam Hansen is set to start his ninth consecutive Grand Tour when he lines up in the Tour de France — a remarkable show of physical and mental strength.

Alejandro Valverde is Movistar’s big hope, in the absence of Nairo Quintana.

Alejandro Valverde is Movistar’s big hope, in the absence of Nairo Quintana. Source: News Limited

MOVISTAR

From: Spain

Sponsor: Movistar is a Spanish mobile telephone communications provider.

One to watch: Alejandro Valverde (ESP). Valverde is one of the most calculating riders in the peloton and when he takes aim at a stage win, he usually delivers or goes very close. But this year he’ll be aiming to finish as high as possible on GC after three top 10 finishes in the past. If Valverde loses significant time after the cobbles on Stage 5 the team could look to Spaniard Benat Intxausti.

Did you know: Movistar has already produced one Grand Tour winner this season, with Colombian climber Nairo Quintana dominating the Giro d’Italia in May. Quintana, who was second overall in last year’s Tour de France, won’t be on the start line this year but will almost certainly challenge for the yellow jersey in 2015.

Mark Cavendish will attempts to add to his 23 Tour de France stage wins.

Mark Cavendish will attempts to add to his 23 Tour de France stage wins. Source: Getty Images

OMEGA PHARMA-QUICKSTEP

From: Belgium

Sponsor: Powerhouse team of the peloton, Omega Pharma is a Belgian pharmaceutical company and Quickstep makes laminate flooring.

One to watch: Mark Cavendish (GBR). Who else, seriously? The record holder for the most stage wins in Tour de France history with 23, Cavendish is universally known as the fastest sprinter in the world but is being challenged like never before with the emergence of Marcel Kittel and Peter Sagan.

Did you know: Polish rider Michael Kwiatkowski was a revelation at last year’s Tour de France, finishing 11th overall and this year ran top five in all three Ardennes Classics. He will take aim at the white young rider jersey.

Simon Germans will be on the lookout for chances to win stages at the Tour.

Simon Germans will be on the lookout for chances to win stages at the Tour. Source: News Limited

ORICA-GREENEDGE

From: Australia

Sponsor: Orica is an Australian-based mining company that provides commercial blasting systems, while Greenedge is the name given to the team, which is owned by Australian sports philanthropist and Cycling Australia president Gerry Ryan.

One to watch: Simon Gerrans (AUS). Gerrans is undoubtedly one of Australia’s greatest ever cyclists. He has won a stage in all three Grand Tours, which included Stages 3 and 4 and a stint in the yellow jersey of last year’s Tour de France. Won Liege-Bastogne-Liege in April and when Gerrans normally takes aim at a stage, he doesn’t miss. GreenEDGE could yet pull a surprise by naming one of the Yates brothers, who would attract plenty of interest on British soil.

Did you know: This could well be the last time Orica-GreenEDGE races the Tour de France without a GC contender after director Matt White in May flagged the possibility of recruiting a Grand Tour leader for next year. But for now, the team is happy targeting stage wins as it did successfully on three occasions at the Giro d’Italia in May.

Christopher Froome will be targeting back to back Tour de France victories.

Christopher Froome will be targeting back to back Tour de France victories. Source: AFP

SKY PROCYCLING

From: Great Britain

Sponsor: Title sponsor of the biggest and most successful team on the WorldTour is the British Sky Broadcasting company, which specialises in satellite, broadcasting, broadband and telephone services.

One to watch: Chris Froome (GBR). The defending champion is almost unstoppable when he lights it up on the major climbs but what makes him such a formidable force is his ability to dominate time trials as well. Froome is aiming to make it three in a row for Sky at the Tour de France after Bradley Wiggins won the 2012 edition.

Did you know: Froome’s most loyal, trusted and reliable teammate is Tasmanian Richie Porte, who is showing all the hallmarks of a future Grand Tour winner himself. Porte is often the last man standing in front of Froome when the race heats up in the mountains.

Marcel Kittel could be the best sprinter in this year’s race.

Marcel Kittel could be the best sprinter in this year’s race. Source: Getty Images

GIANT-SHIMANO

From: The Netherlands

Sponsor: Not surprisingly, the team rides Giant Bikes as one of its major sponsors, along with Shimano, which is a leading bicycle component manufacturer. Shimano also happens to make fishing equipment.

One to watch: Marcel Kittel (GER). Kittel has emerged as a challenger to Mark Cavendish’s throne as the best sprinter in the world. Still only 26, Kittel is big, strong and fast and won four stages of last year’s Tour de France. Expect plenty more where that came from.

Did you know: Just as dangerous as Kittel is his German teammate John Degenkolb, who this year won Gent-Wevelgem, a stage of Paris-Nice and was second in Paris-Roubaix.

EUROPCAR

From: France

Sponsor: The well-known Paris-based rental car company Europcar operates all over the world and has been title sponsor of the cycling team since 2011.

One to watch: Pierre Rolland (FRA). Touted as France’s next Tour de France winner in waiting, Rolland is a talented climber who was eighth overall in last year’s race and finished fourth in the Giro d’Italia in May.

Did you know: Most avid cycling fans will recognise Thomas Voeckler’s face when they see him on TV. Voeckler is renowned for finding his way into a breakaway, which usually results in a solo attack in a last gasp bid for glory. He was supposed to ride the Tour Down Under in Adelaide this year but a collision with a car left him with a broken collarbone.

Alberto Contador will attempt to win a third Tour de France title.

Alberto Contador will attempt to win a third Tour de France title. Source: AFP

TINKOFF-SAXO

From: Denmark/Russia

Sponsor: Joint title sponsors are two banks — Russia’s Tinkoff Bank and Denmark’s Saxo Bank.

One to watch: Alberto Contador (ESP). No surprises here, with Contador among the favourites for this year’s Tour as he chases his third crown after the success of 2007 and 2009. Signs he’s on track arrived at the Criterium du Dauphine with a strong performance and he’ll have a handy support crew led by Australian Michael Rogers.

Did you know: Team owner and Russian businessman Oleg Tinkov is a passionate cyclist who during the Giro d’Italia would ride many of the stages in full team kit and then eat with the riders at night.

TREK FACTORY RACING

From: United States

Sponsor: Trek’s sole title sponsor is Trek bikes, whose machines power the riders during training and racing.

One to watch: Fabian Cancellara (SUI). Superstar time trialist and classics rider who showed he’s still at the top of his game by winning the Tour of Flanders and going top three in Paris-Roubaix and Milan-San Remo this year. Is capable of anything, particularly in the first week of the race.

Did you know: Andy Schleck won the Tour de France in 2010. Remember him? Well he’s still racing and along with brother Frank (who sat out the 2013 season serving a doping ban) will be attacking in the mountains of this year’s race.

COFIDIS, SOLUTIONS CREDITS

From: France

Sponsor: One of the longest running sponsorships in professional cycling, French moneylending service Cofidis has backed the team since 1997.

One to watch: Daniel Navarro Garcia (ESP). A former teammate of Alberto Contador, the Spanish climber has shown he can get results of his own, including ninth overall in last year’s Tour de France and twice finishing top 10 in the Criterium du Dauphine.

Did you know: Cofidis is a second-tier UCI Pro Continental team and has been granted a wildcard to race the Tour de France.

Sylvain Chavanel, pictured riding for Quickstep at last year’s Tour de France, will lead

Sylvain Chavanel, pictured riding for Quickstep at last year’s Tour de France, will lead the IAM team this year. Source: AP

IAM CYCLING

From: Switzerland

Sponsor: The cycling team takes its name from IAM Investment Funds, which is a global financial institution and funds management.

One to watch: Sylvain Chavanel (FRA). Chavanel was IAM Cycling’s big-name recruit in the off-season when they lured him from Quickstep. He is a very good time triallist and multiple stage winner in the Tour de France. Mathias Frank has had a great season and is a good top 10 GC chance after years of service riding for others.

Did you know: IAM Cycling is also home to Australian sprinter Heinrich Haussler, who won the opening stage of Bayern Rundfahrt in May and has good memories of his last Tour de France in which he won an epic Stage 13 with a solo attack in heavy rain.

BRETAGNE-SECHE ENVIRONMENT

From: France.

Sponsor: Seche Environment is a French waste treatment company and came on board as the main sponsor in 2013.

One to watch: Anthony Delaplace (FRA). At 24, Delaplace is one of the emerging young riders in European cycling and was the youngest rider in the Tour de France when he debuted in 2011. He was fifth overall in Circuit de la Sarthe this season.

Did you know: Another Pro Continental team granted a wildcard into the field, Bretagne-Seche Environment will make its Tour de France debut this year.

NETAPP-ENDURA

From: Germany

Sponsor: NetApp is an American computer storage and data management company while Endura is a high quality cycling clothing manufacturer that was founded in Scotland in 1992.

One to watch: Tiago Machado (POR). Machado is a talented climber who spent the previous four years on the WorldTour with RadioShack. Has ridden the Giro and Vuelta but is now set for his Tour de France debut after he finished fourth overall at the recent Tour of California. Keep an eye on Leopold Konig, who won a mountain stage in last year’s Vuelta. Irishman Sam Bennett is sprinting well (won a stage of Bayern-Rundfahrt) so don’t be surprised to see him at the pointy end on some stages.

Did you know: The team’s roster features Australian Zak Dempster, who was a junior track star and is now making a name for himself on the road.

Originally published as Who’s who in the Tour de France zoo

 

Everything you need to know about the teams and contenders in this year’s Tour de France | News.com.au.

Medal events for 2016 Paralympics announced

ITU, in conjunction with the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), today announced three of the six medal events that will be contested in paratriathlon’s debut at the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Paralympic Games. The men’s PT1 and PT4 sport classes have now been confirmed as two of the men’s three medal events, while the women’s PT4 has gained a berth in Rio. “Paratriathlon’s addition to the Paralympic programme is going to be a monumental moment for our sport,” said ITU President and IOC Member Marisol Casado. “As paratriathlon continues to expand drastically each year, we remain committed to evolving with its growing demands and competitiveness. We are hopeful and dedicated to seeing even more medal events contested in Tokyo.” To allow for further analysis of the remaining sport classes, the IPC and ITU will continue working closely together during the summer to identify the remaining medal events. With the six medal events to be evenly split amongst genders, one additional medal event will be assigned for the men, while two medal events will be announced for the women. The IPC will make its final decision on these medal events following its board meeting in October.

Medal events for 2016 Paralympics announced

ITU, in conjunction with the International Paralympic Committee (IPC), today announced three of the six medal events that will be contested in paratriathlon’s debut at the Rio de Janeiro 2016 Paralympic Games. The men’s PT1 and PT4 sport classes have now been confirmed as two of the men’s three medal events, while the women’s PT4 has gained a berth in Rio. “Paratriathlon’s addition to the Paralympic programme is going to be a monumental moment for our sport,” said ITU President and IOC Member Marisol Casado. “As paratriathlon continues to expand drastically each year, we remain committed to evolving with its growing demands and competitiveness. We are hopeful and dedicated to seeing even more medal events contested in Tokyo.” To allow for further analysis of the remaining sport classes, the IPC and ITU will continue working closely together during the summer to identify the remaining medal events. With the six medal events to be evenly split amongst genders, one additional medal event will be assigned for the men, while two medal events will be announced for the women. The IPC will make its final decision on these medal events following its board meeting in October.

Loveland Lake-to-Lake Triathlon Race Report

Two things were clear after the Boulder Sprint Triathlon:  first, my running needed work, and second, so did my taper.  To be clear, the latter was more a result of a week of poor sleep leading up to the race than training too much.  To mitigate the first, I had my coach, Billy start giving me structured running workouts.  Read more about that here.  In reality, it's too far into the season to expect awesome results from the running but I had to try.  My run workouts had been going well (arguably at the expense of my bike).

We adjusted my taper accordingly and I made damn sure I was in bed as early as is possible every night with two young kids.  As a result, I went in feeling fairly fresh.

The race was an hour from my house and a wave start time of 6:30am meant getting up at 3:30.  I don't remember what time I got there but I was definitely one of the first few competitors and got a really good rack spot right by the bike-in/out.  Set up was uneventful and with the several bathroom breaks I didn't have to worry about what to do with my time.  With about 50 minutes until go time, I got the bottom half of my wetsuit on and walked the 1/4-mile to the swim start.  (Yes, 1/4-mile.  Which meant after coming out of the water, there was going to be a nice run to get to T1.)

I got the rest of my wetsuit on and started warming up.  I felt awesome and fast.  I knew I was going to have a good day.  This was also the first time I was going to wear a watch in the race so I could get power data on the bike.  But rather than just keep it on the bike, I wore it the whole race.  This can be a mixed blessing because it's easy to get in one's head if you're not hitting your numbers.

In retrospect, I probably should have gone over the course maps because I realized about a minute before the start that I had the wrong swim course plotted.  Thankfully the elites were paying attention and I got behind them at the start with about a minute to spare.  We got a 10-second countdown (which was nice as usually there's a 30-second warning and then a horn).  Right away I found some fast feet and for the first time since I raced Vineman 70.3 in 2008 I had feet the whole way.  One take away from the swim is that I need to be a lot better at sighting when I'm following in case the person I'm following leads me astray.  I had this thought at some point during the swim and tried to be good about looking for the buoys but I wasn't as good as I should have been.  The second turn on the swim had us swimming directly into the sun and I couldn't see shit.  I just trusted the guy in front of me could and wasn't going to lead me astray.  He didn't, but it was still really unnerving.

I don't recall knowing where I was position wise until I got out on the bike with the two lead elite women and looked at my watch.  I knew then that'd I'd really rocked the swim.  The bike course is hard and it bites right away with uphill rollers heading west out of T1.  With some short downhill recovery, it's basically a climb all the way to Horsetooth Reservoir.  Eventually the lead female started pulling away but I passed and dropped the second place female in the first five miles.  I'd never been this close to the front of a race before and it was really weird only seeing one or two other riders.  At some point I realized that to this point, only three other riders had passed me to this point and I was feeling really good.  I crested the first major climb about half way through the bike and ripped down the descent knowing the next climb was a lot shorter before the long, screaming descent into Ft. Collins.  About 200m from the top, I felt my back tire get a little squishy and realized that the worst thing that could have happened (short of an accident) had happened and I got a flat.  I had put tire sealant in the tubular but my guess is that it didn't kick in until too much air had escaped rendering it essentially useless.  I probably should have tried to refill it to see if it would hold air but wasn't thinking straight and all I could think about was getting the tire off and switching it out.  Instead of using glue, I used Tufo tape to adhere the tire to the rim.  And it's tacky.  REALLY tacky.  I couldn't get the tire off even though I'd left a several inch gap with no tape opposite the valve stem.  It felt like it took forever to change but in reality it was like 6 minutes.  But during that time, all the riders I'd been ahead of were passing me.  I was pissed and any semblance of a race plan went out the window (as indicated by my wattage from that point on as it was all over the map) and I stupidly tried to make up for lost time.  I even yelled at a guy to stop drafting (he wasn't).  The last stretch from Ft. Collins back to Loveland is on S. Taft a very straight stretch of road but it's very exposed and has massive rollers (which doesn't help with trying to maintain a consistent wattage).

The rest of the bike was fine but I was a mental wreck.  I flew into and out of T2 and ran the first mile faster than I should have and finally my body was like "enough" and I struggled through the rest of the run even having to resort to walking a few aid stations on the way back - something I NEVER do.  I was just holding on when I crossed the finish line.

My biggest takeaways were that my taper and recovery were spot on and I need to be able to deal with shit that happens during a race.  Pro triathlete Ben Hoffman raced Ironman Coeur d'Alene on Sunday and flatted twice on the bike.  He could have said "fuck it" and quit or coasted the rest of the way.  But, despite losing 15 minutes on the bike, he ripped off a 2:43 marathon and ran his way to 3rd.  That's how you deal with mental issues.  I got lucky, as I only lost one place due to the flat and the bike course was really hard - which is a great equalizer.  Also, I wonder if my run would have been better.

Thanks to my coach Billy Edwards, my team Foxtrot Wheel & Edgemy teammates, my sponsor GU EnergyColorado Multisport, and my wife for the support.

Race Results:

79th overall, 58th male (185 men total, 338 total athletes)
7th out of 28 in age group w/ flat (6th w/o)
Swim (1500m):  23:57, 2nd fastest in AG and 14th fastest overall
T1: 1:06
Bike (30 mi): 1:35:49 w/ flat (1:29:06 w/o, 7th fastest in AG)
T2: 1:08
Run (10km):  53:38, 18th in AG

Total:  2:55:40 w/flat (2:48:57 w/o)

Loveland Lake-to-Lake Triathlon Race Report

Two things were clear after the Boulder Sprint Triathlon:  first, my running needed work, and second, so did my taper.  To be clear, the latter was more a result of a week of poor sleep leading up to the race than training too much.  To mitigate the first, I had my coach, Billy start giving me structured running workouts.  Read more about that here.  In reality, it's too far into the season to expect awesome results from the running but I had to try.  My run workouts had been going well (arguably at the expense of my bike).

We adjusted my taper accordingly and I made damn sure I was in bed as early as is possible every night with two young kids.  As a result, I went in feeling fairly fresh.

The race was an hour from my house and a wave start time of 6:30am meant getting up at 3:30.  I don't remember what time I got there but I was definitely one of the first few competitors and got a really good rack spot right by the bike-in/out.  Set up was uneventful and with the several bathroom breaks I didn't have to worry about what to do with my time.  With about 50 minutes until go time, I got the bottom half of my wetsuit on and walked the 1/4-mile to the swim start.  (Yes, 1/4-mile.  Which meant after coming out of the water, there was going to be a nice run to get to T1.)

I got the rest of my wetsuit on and started warming up.  I felt awesome and fast.  I knew I was going to have a good day.  This was also the first time I was going to wear a watch in the race so I could get power data on the bike.  But rather than just keep it on the bike, I wore it the whole race.  This can be a mixed blessing because it's easy to get in one's head if you're not hitting your numbers.

In retrospect, I probably should have gone over the course maps because I realized about a minute before the start that I had the wrong swim course plotted.  Thankfully the elites were paying attention and I got behind them at the start with about a minute to spare.  We got a 10-second countdown (which was nice as usually there's a 30-second warning and then a horn).  Right away I found some fast feet and for the first time since I raced Vineman 70.3 in 2008 I had feet the whole way.  One take away from the swim is that I need to be a lot better at sighting when I'm following in case the person I'm following leads me astray.  I had this thought at some point during the swim and tried to be good about looking for the buoys but I wasn't as good as I should have been.  The second turn on the swim had us swimming directly into the sun and I couldn't see shit.  I just trusted the guy in front of me could and wasn't going to lead me astray.  He didn't, but it was still really unnerving.

I don't recall knowing where I was position wise until I got out on the bike with the two lead elite women and looked at my watch.  I knew then that'd I'd really rocked the swim.  The bike course is hard and it bites right away with uphill rollers heading west out of T1.  With some short downhill recovery, it's basically a climb all the way to Horsetooth Reservoir.  Eventually the lead female started pulling away but I passed and dropped the second place female in the first five miles.  I'd never been this close to the front of a race before and it was really weird only seeing one or two other riders.  At some point I realized that to this point, only three other riders had passed me to this point and I was feeling really good.  I crested the first major climb about half way through the bike and ripped down the descent knowing the next climb was a lot shorter before the long, screaming descent into Ft. Collins.  About 200m from the top, I felt my back tire get a little squishy and realized that the worst thing that could have happened (short of an accident) had happened and I got a flat.  I had put tire sealant in the tubular but my guess is that it didn't kick in until too much air had escaped rendering it essentially useless.  I probably should have tried to refill it to see if it would hold air but wasn't thinking straight and all I could think about was getting the tire off and switching it out.  Instead of using glue, I used Tufo tape to adhere the tire to the rim.  And it's tacky.  REALLY tacky.  I couldn't get the tire off even though I'd left a several inch gap with no tape opposite the valve stem.  It felt like it took forever to change but in reality it was like 6 minutes.  But during that time, all the riders I'd been ahead of were passing me.  I was pissed and any semblance of a race plan went out the window (as indicated by my wattage from that point on as it was all over the map) and I stupidly tried to make up for lost time.  I even yelled at a guy to stop drafting (he wasn't).  The last stretch from Ft. Collins back to Loveland is on S. Taft a very straight stretch of road but it's very exposed and has massive rollers (which doesn't help with trying to maintain a consistent wattage).

The rest of the bike was fine but I was a mental wreck.  I flew into and out of T2 and ran the first mile faster than I should have and finally my body was like "enough" and I struggled through the rest of the run even having to resort to walking a few aid stations on the way back - something I NEVER do.  I was just holding on when I crossed the finish line.

My biggest takeaways were that my taper and recovery were spot on and I need to be able to deal with shit that happens during a race.  Pro triathlete Ben Hoffman raced Ironman Coeur d'Alene on Sunday and flatted twice on the bike.  He could have said "fuck it" and quit or coasted the rest of the way.  But, despite losing 15 minutes on the bike, he ripped off a 2:43 marathon and ran his way to 3rd.  That's how you deal with mental issues.  I got lucky, as I only lost one place due to the flat and the bike course was really hard - which is a great equalizer.  Also, I wonder if my run would have been better.

Thanks to my coach Billy Edwards, my team Foxtrot Wheel & Edgemy teammates, my sponsor GU EnergyColorado Multisport, and my wife for the support.

Race Results:

79th overall, 58th male (185 men total, 338 total athletes)
7th out of 28 in age group w/ flat (6th w/o)
Swim (1500m):  23:57, 2nd fastest in AG and 14th fastest overall
T1: 1:06
Bike (30 mi): 1:35:49 w/ flat (1:29:06 w/o, 7th fastest in AG)
T2: 1:08
Run (10km):  53:38, 18th in AG

Total:  2:55:40 w/flat (2:48:57 w/o)

Structured Running

After mediocre runs at the Summer Open and the Boulder Sprint Triathlon, I had my coach, Billy start giving me structured running workouts along with the cycling he was already doing.  Apparently all the lovely base mile running I'd been doing was great for base, not so great for endurance at speed.

Unfortunately, at this point in the season, it was basically too late to expect my body to be able to respond to the training during a race.  (Well, I could expect it, it just wasn't going to happen).  As my coach said, he's not a miracle worker.  There were 3.5 weeks between the Boulder Sprint and Loveland and I did the best I could.

He basically added the equivalent of a long, sub-LT run early in the week, a tempo run (or tempo intervals) in the middle of the week, and a track/interval workout at the end of the week.  I say the equivalent of a long run because with the two knee surgeries, I wanted to be careful of my weekly mileage.

The first week was fantastic in all areas of my training.  My runs and rides were awesome and I was putting up good numbers on the run.  Then week two happened.  My runs were still great, but my riding fell off a cliff.  I had trouble getting any type of power and couldn't hit my numbers.  And I wasn't even close.  Turns out, as Billy put it, I took a full bite of the workouts and we didn't adjust anything to compensate.  As a result my Acute Training Load (ATL) shot way up and instead of being in the mid 80s, they were in the high 90s and low 100s.  As with the other metrics in the performance management chart, the ATL is based on the Training Stress Score (TSS), a number assigned to each workout.  The more intense a workout, the higher the TSS.  A high TSS can also be achieved by doing a less intense workout for a lot longer.  For baseline purposes, a TSS of 100 is performing at 100% effort for an hour.

What was happening was that the more intense workouts were generating a higher daily TSS and thus, a higher ATL.  My inability to hit my wattage numbers on the bike was simply my body saying that it wasn't able to produce the efforts dictated by my workouts - and thus, we should have adjust the workouts to compensate.  But we didn't.

Thankfully, and hopefully this trend continues, within the last week, it appears my body is beginning to adapt.  That said, it's far too late in my season to expect anything more than average results.  Next season, however, my expectations will be quite a bit higher as I will start the structured training program much earlier on.

Garmin Edge 510 Review

First a caveat:  I'm a triathlete.  My review is solely from the point-of-view of a triathlete who's used the Garmin 910XT exclusively for nearly two years.  It may be that none of the cool features or issues I've experienced apply to you.  My motivation for getting the Garmin Edge 510 was the larger screen and thus, the ability to view more data points at one glance rather than having to scroll like I have to do with my 910.  Many of the other selling points (color screen, Bluetooth, touchscreen, live tracking, real time weather, etc...) don't really do it for me.  Sure, the live tracking is cool, but unless I'm racing, I don't need the entire Internet knowing, within 10ft, where I am on the planet.  Part of the draw of training is completely disconnecting from the world, not becoming MORE connected.

Setting up the device was a mixed bag:  the large screen is great, but the touchscreen is kludgy and doesn't always recognize intentional finger presses.  As someone who does full stack Java development and UI development, the UI is pretty bad.  It's not polished and it looks terrible.  It's functional, but it's SO basic it feels like it was designed by a kid in elementary school.  That said, it's mostly obvious what each item does when selecting and adding all my bikes was pretty painless.  With the exception of heart rate, pairing all your ANT+ transmitters (speed/cadence, power, etc...) is done at once and on a per bike basis.  If you aren't using Bluetooth, just a tip to disable it as it'll only help in draining your battery and I've had many friends who've left it on in transition in races and it's gotten confused with all the other electronics present that it doesn't record anything (or if it does, it did so sporadically).  I believe, however, Bluetooth is required for the live-tracking feature and for wirelessly downloading your data to Garmin Connect.

Setting up the data fields in my screens was a snap and like my 910, there's gobs of data points for those statistically inclined.  I use seven fields on my ride (in no particular order):  lap time, lap power, 3s power, lap speed, lap distance, lap cadence, and lap heart rate.  The data is displayed in five rows and as more fields are added the number of rows increases until five are displayed.  When less than five rows are displayed, the rows (and thus the data text) become larger.  This is a nice feature for those folks who might be visually impaired.  To switch screens during a ride, simply tap the screen and select either the left or right arrow that displays at the bottom of the screen.  I'm used to buttons for everything so the fact that the navigation buttons are rendered is a bit odd.  There's plenty of room on the device for more buttons but it's like Garmin was going for a minimalistic design.  The lap and start/stop buttons, however, are actual buttons.

Prior to riding a quick spin of one's pedals is enough to wake up your ANT+ devices and the Garmin will tell you what it's found.  One really annoying thing is that it will not prompt you to calibrate your power meter.  You should ALWAYS do this before a ride to ensure consistent and accurate readings and the 910 does prompt you, but for whatever reason, they didn't make the 510 do this.  Instead, the calibrate feature is buried under your current bike profile and is accessible by tapping on the dumbbell icon.  This icon is only present and clickable if a power meter is currently paired and connected.  I found that calibrating a PowerTap hub is significantly faster (at most a couple of seconds) than doing the same for my Stages power meter which has taken up to 15 seconds.  If you start moving and neglect to press start, the 510 will helpfully tell you that motion has been detected and tell you how to start your data gathering.

I have the 510 mounted on my stem which I'm sure is what Garmin has intended.  Unfortunately, I ride a tri bike and instead of my head being higher up and a lot further back like on a road bike, it's low and forward.  This makes reading the screen a little more challenging and if you have a positively angled stem, you might find reading it impossible.  Mounting on your aero bars is a possibility, but the unit is so big it not only looks ridiculous, your forearm will touch it when riding aero and I don't know about you, but I don't like any distractions when working out or racing and this is a huge distraction.  The other major issue with the stem mounting location on a tri bike is that it's so strategically placed that when riding in the aero position, sweat droplets come off my head and fall directly on the large screen of the 510.  Thanks to surface tension and friction, the droplets just sit there making it hard to read.  Wiping them off is actually worse because not only does it smear and dry with opaque, white, salt streaks, now the touchscreen has, for some reason, become super sensitive and all that touching makes the 510 more than obliged to pop up menus and options over the top of your data fields.  I've ordered a 510-specific Zagg screen protector for it and will try putting some RainX on the Zagg to see if that helps act as a sweat repellant.  I've also ordered a silicone case for the 510 just in case I drop it.  The screen is large and all it has to do is fall face down on uneven ground to get a nice scratch or crack.  And you just know Murphy's Law dictates that it WILL land screen side down if you do drop it.

Don't do this, it goes on your bike


After your ride, hitting stop won't automatically save your workout.  You are prompted to either discard or save it.  This is another change from the 910 and I think is completely unnecessary.  Just save the data, and let the user delete it after they sync.  I've not tried the wireless synching because it requires Bluetooth and a smartphone app.  It does work with Garmin Express, but you have to use the USB cable because the device cannot, apparently, transmit via ANT+ to Garmin Express.  You have to turn the device on before connecting the USB cable or it will think you just want to charge the unit and won't turn on, even if you press the power button.  I am very happy to report that it works great with the Training Peaks Device Agent and works just like my 910 - even better actually since the software hasn't yet been updated to reflect the new file storage location for Garmin Express with the 910.  I should note that the .FIT files Garmin creates for your 510 workouts remain on your device and ARE NOT transferred to your hard drive when synching.  If you want a backup of your data separate from Garmin Connect (or Training Peaks, ...) the 510 mounts like a USB PIN drive and you can see the data in your OS' normal means of browsing an attached drive.  In fact, this is from where the Training Peaks Device Agent pulls your workout data.

Bottom line, as a whole I'm not thrilled with the device.  It's certainly not meant for triathletes and as a whole is just a poor user experience with a kludgy UI and ornery touchscreen.  That said, the most important feature for me was the large screen and easy viewing of my data points and if I can solve my sweat droplet problems, it's good enough for me.  I will say that I'm quite curious to try it out on my road bike to see if some of the annoyances will either go away or become less.